Jack And Sally – Who We Become CD EP (Engineer Records)

Who We Become is a debut EP recording by Jack And Sally, East London-based pop-punk trio. The group nurtures profoundly emotive pop-punk sound since 2018 and their music vividly resembles heavyweights of the abovementioned genre. However, Ben Felix, Joshua Jacobs, and Pravir Ramasundaram tend to saturate this specific subgenre of punk rock with some decent signature moves. Previously, Jack And Sally announced this material through a couple of singles over social media, such as Tomorrow’s Revolution and Macy. Who We Become precisely showcases upgraded songwriting and composing through five exceptional numbers that, by any means, exceed all expectations.

Who We Become commences with Superstar, neat opening tune with appropriate arpeggiated intro, followed by warm sounding basslines. All of a sudden, the number transits into a polyphonic orchestration, supported by dynamic drumming experience. Superstar includes all the essentials of pop-punk, such as palm-muted chord progressions, massive build-ups, gracious choruses highlighted by excellent lead vocals. The entire group demonstrates notable musicianship through this song. The trio continues at the same pace with Nevernia, perfectly structured number pervaded by brilliant arrangements. This particular composition resembles older works by Descendents, a legendary pop-punk group that shaped up this spectacular genre. However, Jack And Sally are leaning towards the more contemporary sound, stacked by impressive guitar licks. Perhaps it possesses bits and pieces of mentioned pop-punk greats, but they’re certainly not doing it purposely.

On the other hand, Tomorrow’s Revolution outstands with remarkable octave ridden themes, dominantly presented through the entire number. The verses are carrying another generous serving of palm-muted riffages that are simultaneously leading to beautiful chorus segments. The band progresses through this tune with such graciousness, and the complete trio function as a unified mechanism. Long Way Home settles the atmosphere with subtle indie melodies, mainly showcased through arpeggiated sequences, appropriate low-end tones, and distinct drumming performance. Like the previous numbers, Long Way Home includes a slightly melancholic chorus that instantly melts the heart. Jack And Sally decided to finish this remarkable EP with Macy, one of the singles they’ve previously announced this material across the web. The band introduces a short and concise piano segment at the very beginning of the song. It provides a bit of refreshment, and it serves as an appealing intro for this particular tune. This number sounds a bit anthemic, like a retrospective love song that brings back memories. It liberates a decent amount of emotions over some classic pop-punk orchestrations, but also provides such a beautiful closure to this material.

Perhaps Who We Become leans towards the contemporary pop-punk sound, but Jack And Sally include some indie, alternative and classic punk rock movements that enhance the overall listening experience. The material resembles some standard sonic maneuvers previously provided by the renowned bands, such as Descendents, Weezer, Samiam, or Farside. However, resemblances are notable only through minimal accentuations implemented somewhere beneath the thoughtfully arranged compositions. Who We Become comes housed in a pro-done cardboard sleeve, accompanied by beautiful artwork. Like anything Engineer Records published so far, this compact disc stands out with quality, presented both visually and musically. Head over to the Engineer Records web store and purchase this marvelous release.

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